Innovation @ NIST

| Bangkok, Thailand Curated by NIST's Learning Innovation Coaches

Student Voice and Choice in Year 9 Advisory

Part of NIST’s vision is to provide individualised pathways to students as a way to personalise their educational experience, and to keep them engaged in the things that already inspire them. One way that Jenny Friedman, the Year 9 advisory team leader, has incorporated individualised learning in the Year 9 advisory program is by introducing an electives period every two weeks for Year 9 students. As a way to make this even more student-focused, the children had a say as to what electives were being offered to them, then teachers developed programs around the students’ passions and interests. Some of the units being offered include using Minecraft to make a scale model of the NIST campus, interactive fiction writing, cooking made easy, video game design and more. When asked what they think about electives, a student said they liked the format because it was more engaging, they liked the ability to choose things that interested them and they like that there was a large variety of options to choose from in a range of categories such as active, creative, etc. Programs like this help students find their passions or engage them in their passion during the normal school day, which keeps them engaged and excited about their learning.

Systems Thinking in the Early Years

Systems Thinking means that we look at things as a whole rather than a jumble of parts. It means we observe a system and understand the connections and interactions between the many elements.  

“It’s when little things work to make a big thing.”  – Sean

The children in the Early Years have been inquiring into how the decisions we make can have an impact on the systems around us. They researched how systems work through playful introductions to coding, invitations that encouraged exploration of cause and effect, and conversations that drew out the ‘parts that make up the whole’ in already known systems.  

By recognizing and realizing systems around us, we are better able to see how everything is interconnected. Systems Thinking is a powerful way for children to understand why situations are the way they are. They can look at problems in new ways – leading to new solutions.

#EveryoneCanCreate

Since returning from winter break we have been unleashing student’s creativity in the upper elementary classrooms. We have been exploring the Everyone Can Create curriculum from Apple Education. This curriculum leverages the powerful tools that are available to our students on their iPads. The Everyone Can Create curriculum is a series of four books that focus on drawing, photography, video, and music. Each book is full of hands-on, engaging activities that allow the students to explore and experiment in a structured and scaffolded manner. Students are encouraged to “stretch their imaginations and make connections they might not otherwise make — and carry all these skills through everything they’ll do in school.” So far, the students have been very engaged and energized while learning about drawing tools. Students are exploring balance and symmetry, making lines, shapes, shading, color, and texture and how these can influence mood and tone when illustrations are added to a story. The students are super engaged in the activities, and we have been blown away at the quality and variety of student work. We are very excited to see how the students engage with these skills and concepts, and how this transfers to other areas of the curriculum.  

Middle School Action Week 2

The first week of September, all middle school students go off campus on action week trips. Then, during the last week of the calendar year, all middle school students at NIST participate in Action Week 2, which is an off-timetable week where students work on a week-long project. Each year level participates in different projects in each year level, making the week dynamic and engaging all throughout the NIST middle school experience.

Year 7 Innovation Week
In Year 7, all students choose an experience that they would like to explore and inquire into for the week. They come up with new innovations around their choice of machines, kindness, pollution, food and fairy tales. Students take action and create goals around these projects in groups of three to six. Collaboration is key to achieving their student-developed goals.

Year 8 “Who Are We?”
In Year 8, the week is all about investigating further into our guiding question, “Who are we?” and expanding this knowledge from our advisory classes and Year 8, to the broader NIST community. The students’ interview members of staff who work behind the scenes. These are people they may not interact with on a daily basis, but do contribute greatly to their time and experience at NIST. After the students get to know them, they decide on a way to share their story with the rest of the NIST community, creating a product for this staff member. Some choose to make documentaries or animations, while others create pieces of art, newspapers, podcasts, and we even had one group write and perform a song! All video work can be found at this YouTube playlist.

Year 9 “What’s Your Frog”
In year nine this year there was a new experience for the students where they determined their interests and passions, then develop a project around this. Some students decide to draw attention to inequality and poverty through slum photography projects, others are building care packs for children in detention centres, while some groups decided to create awareness around gender and sexuality equality plus many more wonderful ideas. This week students locked in their plan so they can be successful with their project by the end of the school year. They also took a field trip to different locations around the city to learn how people are working to help those in their small communities.

Innovation Spotlight: Computer Science Education Week 2019

Students have had some amazing experiences this week with computer science at many different year levels. Every year at this time, Code.org promotes Computer Science Education Week around the world in order to raise awareness about computer science. Classes from the elementary school and the secondary school have participated in a number of activities. Our hope is that with some exposure that some students will understand that they can succeed in this valuable area. Our students are learning to code both online and offline and are developing the skills needed for the future of work in 2030, such as effective communication, creative and critical thinking, problem-solving and people skills.

Try your own Hour of Code activity. Better yet, create something as a family.

Do you remember trying this out last year?

 

Loy Krathong Design Unit

This week, Year 2 celebrated Loy Krathong with some very exciting Krathongs that were designed and built by the Year 2 students. This project was a result of the Year 2 team working with Melissa Daniels of High Tech High to utilize a project tuning protocol to redesign the unit. 

The Krathongs were built in the Makerspace and were the culmination of a unit exploring materials and the design process. The objective was to create a Krathong that adhered to specific design principles. The design principles used to build the Krathong were: it must be symmetrical, it must use almost all nature-made materials, it must include decorations, it must stay together, and it must float for a long time.

The students absolutely loved this unit, and they learned a lot about the design process, properties of materials, and the cultural significance of Loy Krathong. The students also loved learning and making in the Makerspace. Great job, Year 2 students!

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